waterloo regional police 4 times more likely to stop you if you are blackwaterloo regional police 4 times more likely to stop you if you are blackwaterloo regional police 4 times more likely to stop you if you are black - one way car alarm

by:Kingcobra     2019-09-13
waterloo regional police 4 times more likely to stop you if you are blackwaterloo regional police 4 times more likely to stop you if you are blackwaterloo regional police 4 times more likely to stop you if you are black  -  one way car alarm
Waterloo area
If you are black, the Waterloo area police are more likely to stop you on the street and ask for your identity without accusing you of committing a crime.
This record was found by comparing the 62,350 people who had been stopped by the police for 10 years with the population of the region.
"I was very upset to hear the news.
But did that surprise me?
"No," said Marcia smali, chairman of the local branch of the Black Women's Congress in Ontario, Canada.
"People have stereotypes about black people, especially black men.
The police are not immune.
"Other communities have also found that it is more likely that the police will stop black people and question them without making allegations.
This happens in a controversial practice called Street inspections, also known as grooming.
The record's analysis of local street inspections shows that "it's not just a matter of Toronto," said Renu Mandhane, Ontario Human Rights Commissioner.
"Systemic racism still exists in a variety of different urban settings.
Police Chief Brian Larkin could not explain why his police stopped at a far higher rate than the black population to ask about black people.
"I don't have a clear answer.
"This is something we need to focus on," he said . ".
"I fundamentally believe that our police officers are going out very well --
To make a difference.
"This is certainly something that shouldn't have happened.
Tom Galloway, chairman of the civil commission that oversees the police, said: "There should be no undue cessation . ".
He expects the Police Service Commission to now investigate police data.
The record's findings are based on police data that were not reviewed before the newspaper requested it.
The analysis investigated 62,350 people who were stopped and taken away by regional police during the period from 2006 to 2015.
Main findings: according to the 2011 census, two of the 100 random residents in the region were black.
Of the 100 people transported by police, 9 were black.
This ratio is four times the population of the region.
The police did not impose penalties on whites or other distinct ethnic minorities that exceeded their population.
Larkin warned that police had inspected some people who were not local residents.
He said it's an intelligence to get close to people recording their names.
Try to determine how people relate to each other.
For example, he thinks it helps to fight crime and help identify gang members.
Police will also warn personnel when they find suspicious behavior to support the investigation.
Larkin said he understood the critic's argument that
Sorting out black people's discontent with the police and stopping the communityoperation.
"It's a blunt tool because in the grid you capture the kind, decent, young kids you tell them to respect the law," says Allan-Brown.
Chairman of the Guelph Black Heritage Association.
"However, they are still harassed in their view.
Brown understood that the police needed to know who the stinking eggs were, but felt that street inspections had more problems than they had solved.
"There should be a better way to do what they are doing," he said . ". "I think (police)
Has poisoned the way they can do anything, because you have lost the trust of the people you want to see, "said Lauris da Costa, who helped guide the Caribbean Association in Waterloo, Canada.
"We don't have data to show that grooming actually solves the crime," mandehan said . ".
In response to the dispute, the free government began tightening Street inspection rules this week starting next year.
The exception is that when preventing someone from getting a name, the officer must provide a badge number to tell people that they can refuse to answer and tell people where to complain.
It is illegal for the police to stop someone arbitrarily, or simply because of their race, or because the person is in a high crime area.
As it is today, the police will be able to stop people and force them to identify when daily traffic stops, someone is arrested or detained or a search warrant is executed.
"We have made it clear that arbitrary and race --
The collection and storage of skin color-based personal information based on police street checks is illegal, disrespectful, and has no place in our society, yasir Naqvi, Minister of Community security, said in a statement.
When the rules were put forward, the chief of police objected to the rules of combing, saying that they were not feasible.
Now that these rules have become law, Larkin intends to implement them, and he is considering a public meeting to educate people.
"This will bring clear and consistent guidelines across the province," Larkin said . ".
He likes the government to train the police more on the issue of prejudice.
He likes that the government has ordered a regular review of the grooming data.
He hoped that the review would provide evidence to further clarify the usefulness of the review.
He is worried about costs and deadlines.
He is concerned that people may come to the wrong conclusion that while the law still stipulates that they must tell the police their name, they can refuse to tell the police their name, for example, when it comes to traffic violations
"What I really care about is the public confusion," Larkin said . "
Black leaders know the feeling of being blocked by the police and suspect it's just because of their skin.
Retired High School teacher Smellie recalled that local police had stopped her in her car twice, asking who she was and what she was doing before she was on the road.
She was confused because the station had nothing to do with traffic.
Brown, a retired salesperson, recalls that Québec police had stopped him twice when he was a student, walked down the street and asked him who he was before he was asked to leave.
These disturbing events took place a few years ago.
But today, the police still often stop people from asking who they are and what they are doing.
On a typical day, the Waterloo area police did eight such things and entered 17 names in a growing identity database.
Between 2006 and 2015, the police blocked a total of 25,208 people from asking what they were doing and documenting their identity.
Because the police intercepted many people many times, one was intercepted five times, and the number of people intercepted was as high as 62,350.
Records requested and obtained by all 25,208 individuals were stopped.
For some, the game is unknown because the police do not need to record the game in the street check.
Sometimes the police know the game from the other records they have about a person.
The newspaper found that police had better race data on individuals they stopped over and over again.
However, this pattern is consistent --
Police have always stopped black people at a much higher rate than their share of the local population, which is 2%.
Over the past 10 years, 62,350 people have been blocked and the police know their race.
Nine of these people are black.
Remember that the same person stopped five times, just like five people stopped.
For 16,670 people who have been hijacked once by the police, the police know that their race is occupied.
Seven of these people are black.
For 3,403 people who have been there twice but no more, the police know their race.
Eight of these people are black.
For 5,045 people who have 3 or more times, the police know their race.
Ten percent of these people are black.
The record further analyzes the police records by address and date to reveal: police sometimes conduct card checks on people when investigations and arrests are coming.
Police sometimes carry out card checks on abandoned properties that undermine neighbors and alert security authorities.
Sometimes, the authorities later closed the properties or quoted them on the grounds of bad, unsafe living conditions.
Larkin noted that these incidents were examples of police collecting names and were investigative tools for monitoring trouble makers, justifying search warrants and arrests.
He admitted that the police did not do well in persuading the public to sort out the problem of crime, in part because the police usually only used anecdotes for debate.
One of the striking addresses is 63 Cortland Avenue. E.
In kidina, a red one.
Brick commercial complex.
Last year, police began investigating when neighboring businesses complained about a company called Connect Computers.
Combing the records helps tell the story of the investigation.
More than two months between February
On April 9 and 8, the police went to the complex 10 times to intercept and punch the people who came and went.
The police were there in the afternoon, in the evening and in the middle of the night.
In the end, the police blocked 21 people from recording their names and entering them into the database.
This includes 17 people, 1 person, 2 people, 1 person, 33 people, 3 people, 40 people and 3 people.
On April 9, 2015, police conducted the last street inspection at the complex, sorting out three men and one woman.
Police obtained a search warrant at 7: 00 on April 16. m.
They took a search warrant to do computer business, arrested two men and one woman, and charged them with drug crimes.
"I think some of us in our community are going to say, 'the police are doing a good job of doing that," Larkin said. '.
Another address is a troubled apartment building located at 48 Weber Street. W. in Kitchener.
On last July, with the support of the police, city bylaw officials cleared the deteriorating building and gave the tenants hours to pack up and leave.
Tenants refer to the building as a disaster and its public areas are littered with evidence of human feces, blood, urine, syringes and other rampant drug use.
City officials cited fire hazards and substandard pipelines.
According to the records, the police visited the building 168 times from 2009 to 2015, preventing 396 people from recording their identity.
During the six months leading up to the closure, the police entered the building 34 times at any time, blocked 48 people and recorded their names.
Ten people were carried many times.
Police conducted their last street check at 48 Weber Street. W.
Six days before the authorities closed the building.
Another prominent address is a troublesome 35-
Apartment building in Erb St 154E. in Waterloo.
In last August, a provincial agency turned off power for five molds
Troubled the unit on the grounds of major electrical problems.
During the period from 2011 to 2015, police visited the building 43 times and stopped 67 people on the street asking them to show their identification.
11 people were driven many times.
Larkin believes that if the police find it more difficult to persuade people to voluntarily provide names under stricter rules, the police may order fewer cards.
If this happens, he expects that the value of the street inspection may become clearer in one way or another.
We sorted out the numbers through the numbersHow. Records analyzed the records of 62,350 persons, and during the period from 2006 to 28,881, the Waterloo district police conducted 10,314 Street inspections at 2015 addresses.
Police intercepted a total of 25,208 different people.
This includes 16,760 stops only once, and 8,448 stops more than once, with an average of five stops each.
The data published to the newspaper included gender, age, race, date, time, and the address of someone blocked by officials.
It does not include the name or home address of the person being blocked.
The police replaced the name with a unique digital identifier, which allowed the newspaper to track the individual over time.
The police provided the match for the 89 people they intercepted.
This includes 67 people only once, and 94 people more than once.
The police do not need to describe the race when completing the Street inspection.
In some cases, the police determine the race based on other records about the person.
Black people account for two of the population of the region, but in the population of all, nine people were stopped, only seven adults were abducted once, and nine people were transported more than once, all eight people were transported.
Who does the police stop every day, ask who, who is the card?
On a typical day, the police intercepted 17 people on the street, asked them to provide identification, and recorded their names without making allegations.
Enter the name and other identification features into the electronic database.
Comb the twisted men and the twisted youth.
On a typical day, 12 men and 4 women will see police cards.
This includes nine people under the age of 30.
Police randomly selected seven persons under the age of 30 and nine persons over the age of 37.
For five people, it was the only time the police warned them.
Because the police had checked them before, a dozen people knew about the exercise.
On a typical day, the police give cards to 12 white people, 2 black people and 1 other visible minority.
There is no record of the two.
Can I refuse to confirm my identity in the street check?
Yes, but in other cases, such as when parking due to traffic violations, you still have to show your identity to the police.
"If people are not arrested, they can leave the police," said Ontario Human Rights Commissioner Renu Mandhane . ".
"In many ways, if people know their rights, the problem may not be a big problem as it is now.
"Jouthit @ therecord.
Waterloo-
If you are black, the Waterloo area police are more likely to stop you on the street and ask for your identity without accusing you of committing a crime.
This record was found by comparing the 62,350 people who had been stopped by the police for 10 years with the population of the region.
"I was very upset to hear the news.
But did that surprise me?
"No," said Marcia smali, chairman of the local branch of the Black Women's Congress in Ontario, Canada.
"People have stereotypes about black people, especially black men.
The police are not immune.
"Other communities have also found that it is more likely that the police will stop black people and question them without making allegations.
This happens in a controversial practice called Street inspections, also known as grooming.
The record's analysis of local street inspections shows that "it's not just a matter of Toronto," said Renu Mandhane, Ontario Human Rights Commissioner.
"Systemic racism still exists in a variety of different urban settings.
Police Chief Brian Larkin could not explain why his police stopped at a far higher rate than the black population to ask about black people.
"I don't have a clear answer.
"This is something we need to focus on," he said . ".
"I fundamentally believe that our police officers are going out very well --
To make a difference.
"This is certainly something that shouldn't have happened.
Tom Galloway, chairman of the civil commission that oversees the police, said: "There should be no undue cessation . ".
He expects the Police Service Commission to now investigate police data.
The record's findings are based on police data that were not reviewed before the newspaper requested it.
The analysis investigated 62,350 people who were stopped and taken away by regional police during the period from 2006 to 2015.
Main findings: according to the 2011 census, two of the 100 random residents in the region were black.
Of the 100 people transported by police, 9 were black.
This ratio is four times the population of the region.
The police did not impose penalties on whites or other distinct ethnic minorities that exceeded their population.
Larkin warned that police had inspected some people who were not local residents.
He said it's an intelligence to get close to people recording their names.
Try to determine how people relate to each other.
For example, he thinks it helps to fight crime and help identify gang members.
Police will also warn personnel when they find suspicious behavior to support the investigation.
Larkin said he understood the critic's argument that
Sorting out black people's discontent with the police and stopping the communityoperation.
"It's a blunt tool because in the grid you capture the kind, decent, young kids you tell them to respect the law," says Allan-Brown.
Chairman of the Guelph Black Heritage Association.
"However, they are still harassed in their view.
Brown understood that the police needed to know who the stinking eggs were, but felt that street inspections had more problems than they had solved.
"There should be a better way to do what they are doing," he said . ". "I think (police)
Has poisoned the way they can do anything, because you have lost the trust of the people you want to see, "said Lauris da Costa, who helped guide the Caribbean Association in Waterloo, Canada.
"We don't have data to show that grooming actually solves the crime," mandehan said . ".
In response to the dispute, the free government began tightening Street inspection rules this week starting next year.
The exception is that when preventing someone from getting a name, the officer must provide a badge number to tell people that they can refuse to answer and tell people where to complain.
It is illegal for the police to stop someone arbitrarily, or simply because of their race, or because the person is in a high crime area.
As it is today, the police will be able to stop people and force them to identify when daily traffic stops, someone is arrested or detained or a search warrant is executed.
"We have made it clear that arbitrary and race --
The collection and storage of skin color-based personal information based on police street checks is illegal, disrespectful, and has no place in our society, yasir Naqvi, Minister of Community security, said in a statement.
When the rules were put forward, the chief of police objected to the rules of combing, saying that they were not feasible.
Now that these rules have become law, Larkin intends to implement them, and he is considering a public meeting to educate people.
"This will bring clear and consistent guidelines across the province," Larkin said . ".
He likes the government to train the police more on the issue of prejudice.
He likes that the government has ordered a regular review of the grooming data.
He hoped that the review would provide evidence to further clarify the usefulness of the review.
He is worried about costs and deadlines.
He is concerned that people may come to the wrong conclusion that while the law still stipulates that they must tell the police their name, they can refuse to tell the police their name, for example, when it comes to traffic violations
"What I really care about is the public confusion," Larkin said . "
Black leaders know the feeling of being blocked by the police and suspect it's just because of their skin.
Retired High School teacher Smellie recalled that local police had stopped her in her car twice, asking who she was and what she was doing before she was on the road.
She was confused because the station had nothing to do with traffic.
Brown, a retired salesperson, recalls that Québec police had stopped him twice when he was a student, walked down the street and asked him who he was before he was asked to leave.
These disturbing events took place a few years ago.
But today, the police still often stop people from asking who they are and what they are doing.
On a typical day, the Waterloo area police did eight such things and entered 17 names in a growing identity database.
Between 2006 and 2015, the police blocked a total of 25,208 people from asking what they were doing and documenting their identity.
Because the police intercepted many people many times, one was intercepted five times, and the number of people intercepted was as high as 62,350.
Records requested and obtained by all 25,208 individuals were stopped.
For some, the game is unknown because the police do not need to record the game in the street check.
Sometimes the police know the game from the other records they have about a person.
The newspaper found that police had better race data on individuals they stopped over and over again.
However, this pattern is consistent --
Police have always stopped black people at a much higher rate than their share of the local population, which is 2%.
Over the past 10 years, 62,350 people have been blocked and the police know their race.
Nine of these people are black.
Remember that the same person stopped five times, just like five people stopped.
For 16,670 people who have been hijacked once by the police, the police know that their race is occupied.
Seven of these people are black.
For 3,403 people who have been there twice but no more, the police know their race.
Eight of these people are black.
For 5,045 people who have 3 or more times, the police know their race.
Ten percent of these people are black.
The record further analyzes the police records by address and date to reveal: police sometimes conduct card checks on people when investigations and arrests are coming.
Police sometimes carry out card checks on abandoned properties that undermine neighbors and alert security authorities.
Sometimes, the authorities later closed the properties or quoted them on the grounds of bad, unsafe living conditions.
Larkin noted that these incidents were examples of police collecting names and were investigative tools for monitoring trouble makers, justifying search warrants and arrests.
He admitted that the police did not do well in persuading the public to sort out the problem of crime, in part because the police usually only used anecdotes for debate.
One of the striking addresses is 63 Cortland Avenue. E.
In kidina, a red one.
Brick commercial complex.
Last year, police began investigating when neighboring businesses complained about a company called Connect Computers.
Combing the records helps tell the story of the investigation.
More than two months between February
On April 9 and 8, the police went to the complex 10 times to intercept and punch the people who came and went.
The police were there in the afternoon, in the evening and in the middle of the night.
In the end, the police blocked 21 people from recording their names and entering them into the database.
This includes 17 people, 1 person, 2 people, 1 person, 33 people, 3 people, 40 people and 3 people.
On April 9, 2015, police conducted the last street inspection at the complex, sorting out three men and one woman.
Police obtained a search warrant at 7: 00 on April 16. m.
They took a search warrant to do computer business, arrested two men and one woman, and charged them with drug crimes.
"I think some of us in our community are going to say, 'the police are doing a good job of doing that," Larkin said. '.
Another address is a troubled apartment building located at 48 Weber Street. W. in Kitchener.
On last July, with the support of the police, city bylaw officials cleared the deteriorating building and gave the tenants hours to pack up and leave.
Tenants refer to the building as a disaster and its public areas are littered with evidence of human feces, blood, urine, syringes and other rampant drug use.
City officials cited fire hazards and substandard pipelines.
According to the records, the police visited the building 168 times from 2009 to 2015, preventing 396 people from recording their identity.
During the six months leading up to the closure, the police entered the building 34 times at any time, blocked 48 people and recorded their names.
Ten people were carried many times.
Police conducted their last street check at 48 Weber Street. W.
Six days before the authorities closed the building.
Another prominent address is a troublesome 35-
Apartment building in Erb St 154E. in Waterloo.
In last August, a provincial agency turned off power for five molds
Troubled the unit on the grounds of major electrical problems.
During the period from 2011 to 2015, police visited the building 43 times and stopped 67 people on the street asking them to show their identification.
11 people were driven many times.
Larkin believes that if the police find it more difficult to persuade people to voluntarily provide names under stricter rules, the police may order fewer cards.
If this happens, he expects that the value of the street inspection may become clearer in one way or another.
We sorted out the numbers through the numbersHow. Records analyzed the records of 62,350 persons, and during the period from 2006 to 28,881, the Waterloo district police conducted 10,314 Street inspections at 2015 addresses.
Police intercepted a total of 25,208 different people.
This includes 16,760 stops only once, and 8,448 stops more than once, with an average of five stops each.
The data published to the newspaper included gender, age, race, date, time, and the address of someone blocked by officials.
It does not include the name or home address of the person being blocked.
The police replaced the name with a unique digital identifier, which allowed the newspaper to track the individual over time.
The police provided the match for the 89 people they intercepted.
This includes 67 people only once, and 94 people more than once.
The police do not need to describe the race when completing the Street inspection.
In some cases, the police determine the race based on other records about the person.
Black people account for two of the population of the region, but in the population of all, nine people were stopped, only seven adults were abducted once, and nine people were transported more than once, all eight people were transported.
Who does the police stop every day, ask who, who is the card?
On a typical day, the police intercepted 17 people on the street, asked them to provide identification, and recorded their names without making allegations.
Enter the name and other identification features into the electronic database.
Comb the twisted men and the twisted youth.
On a typical day, 12 men and 4 women will see police cards.
This includes nine people under the age of 30.
Police randomly selected seven persons under the age of 30 and nine persons over the age of 37.
For five people, it was the only time the police warned them.
Because the police had checked them before, a dozen people knew about the exercise.
On a typical day, the police give cards to 12 white people, 2 black people and 1 other visible minority.
There is no record of the two.
Can I refuse to confirm my identity in the street check?
Yes, but in other cases, such as when parking due to traffic violations, you still have to show your identity to the police.
"If people are not arrested, they can leave the police," said Ontario Human Rights Commissioner Renu Mandhane . ".
"In many ways, if people know their rights, the problem may not be a big problem as it is now.
"Jouthit @ therecord.
Waterloo-
If you are black, the Waterloo area police are more likely to stop you on the street and ask for your identity without accusing you of committing a crime.
This record was found by comparing the 62,350 people who had been stopped by the police for 10 years with the population of the region.
"I was very upset to hear the news.
But did that surprise me?
"No," said Marcia smali, chairman of the local branch of the Black Women's Congress in Ontario, Canada.
"People have stereotypes about black people, especially black men.
The police are not immune.
"Other communities have also found that it is more likely that the police will stop black people and question them without making allegations.
This happens in a controversial practice called Street inspections, also known as grooming.
The record's analysis of local street inspections shows that "it's not just a matter of Toronto," said Renu Mandhane, Ontario Human Rights Commissioner.
"Systemic racism still exists in a variety of different urban settings.
Police Chief Brian Larkin could not explain why his police stopped at a far higher rate than the black population to ask about black people.
"I don't have a clear answer.
"This is something we need to focus on," he said . ".
"I fundamentally believe that our police officers are going out very well --
To make a difference.
"This is certainly something that shouldn't have happened.
Tom Galloway, chairman of the civil commission that oversees the police, said: "There should be no undue cessation . ".
He expects the Police Service Commission to now investigate police data.
The record's findings are based on police data that were not reviewed before the newspaper requested it.
The analysis investigated 62,350 people who were stopped and taken away by regional police during the period from 2006 to 2015.
Main findings: according to the 2011 census, two of the 100 random residents in the region were black.
Of the 100 people transported by police, 9 were black.
This ratio is four times the population of the region.
The police did not impose penalties on whites or other distinct ethnic minorities that exceeded their population.
Larkin warned that police had inspected some people who were not local residents.
He said it's an intelligence to get close to people recording their names.
Try to determine how people relate to each other.
For example, he thinks it helps to fight crime and help identify gang members.
Police will also warn personnel when they find suspicious behavior to support the investigation.
Larkin said he understood the critic's argument that
Sorting out black people's discontent with the police and stopping the communityoperation.
"It's a blunt tool because in the grid you capture the kind, decent, young kids you tell them to respect the law," says Allan-Brown.
Chairman of the Guelph Black Heritage Association.
"However, they are still harassed in their view.
Brown understood that the police needed to know who the stinking eggs were, but felt that street inspections had more problems than they had solved.
"There should be a better way to do what they are doing," he said . ". "I think (police)
Has poisoned the way they can do anything, because you have lost the trust of the people you want to see, "said Lauris da Costa, who helped guide the Caribbean Association in Waterloo, Canada.
"We don't have data to show that grooming actually solves the crime," mandehan said . ".
In response to the dispute, the free government began tightening Street inspection rules this week starting next year.
The exception is that when preventing someone from getting a name, the officer must provide a badge number to tell people that they can refuse to answer and tell people where to complain.
It is illegal for the police to stop someone arbitrarily, or simply because of their race, or because the person is in a high crime area.
As it is today, the police will be able to stop people and force them to identify when daily traffic stops, someone is arrested or detained or a search warrant is executed.
"We have made it clear that arbitrary and race --
The collection and storage of skin color-based personal information based on police street checks is illegal, disrespectful, and has no place in our society, yasir Naqvi, Minister of Community security, said in a statement.
When the rules were put forward, the chief of police objected to the rules of combing, saying that they were not feasible.
Now that these rules have become law, Larkin intends to implement them, and he is considering a public meeting to educate people.
"This will bring clear and consistent guidelines across the province," Larkin said . ".
He likes the government to train the police more on the issue of prejudice.
He likes that the government has ordered a regular review of the grooming data.
He hoped that the review would provide evidence to further clarify the usefulness of the review.
He is worried about costs and deadlines.
He is concerned that people may come to the wrong conclusion that while the law still stipulates that they must tell the police their name, they can refuse to tell the police their name, for example, when it comes to traffic violations
"What I really care about is the public confusion," Larkin said . "
Black leaders know the feeling of being blocked by the police and suspect it's just because of their skin.
Retired High School teacher Smellie recalled that local police had stopped her in her car twice, asking who she was and what she was doing before she was on the road.
She was confused because the station had nothing to do with traffic.
Brown, a retired salesperson, recalls that Québec police had stopped him twice when he was a student, walked down the street and asked him who he was before he was asked to leave.
These disturbing events took place a few years ago.
But today, the police still often stop people from asking who they are and what they are doing.
On a typical day, the Waterloo area police did eight such things and entered 17 names in a growing identity database.
Between 2006 and 2015, the police blocked a total of 25,208 people from asking what they were doing and documenting their identity.
Because the police intercepted many people many times, one was intercepted five times, and the number of people intercepted was as high as 62,350.
Records requested and obtained by all 25,208 individuals were stopped.
For some, the game is unknown because the police do not need to record the game in the street check.
Sometimes the police know the game from the other records they have about a person.
The newspaper found that police had better race data on individuals they stopped over and over again.
However, this pattern is consistent --
Police have always stopped black people at a much higher rate than their share of the local population, which is 2%.
Over the past 10 years, 62,350 people have been blocked and the police know their race.
Nine of these people are black.
Remember that the same person stopped five times, just like five people stopped.
For 16,670 people who have been hijacked once by the police, the police know that their race is occupied.
Seven of these people are black.
For 3,403 people who have been there twice but no more, the police know their race.
Eight of these people are black.
For 5,045 people who have 3 or more times, the police know their race.
Ten percent of these people are black.
The record further analyzes the police records by address and date to reveal: police sometimes conduct card checks on people when investigations and arrests are coming.
Police sometimes carry out card checks on abandoned properties that undermine neighbors and alert security authorities.
Sometimes, the authorities later closed the properties or quoted them on the grounds of bad, unsafe living conditions.
Larkin noted that these incidents were examples of police collecting names and were investigative tools for monitoring trouble makers, justifying search warrants and arrests.
He admitted that the police did not do well in persuading the public to sort out the problem of crime, in part because the police usually only used anecdotes for debate.
One of the striking addresses is 63 Cortland Avenue. E.
In kidina, a red one.
Brick commercial complex.
Last year, police began investigating when neighboring businesses complained about a company called Connect Computers.
Combing the records helps tell the story of the investigation.
More than two months between February
On April 9 and 8, the police went to the complex 10 times to intercept and punch the people who came and went.
The police were there in the afternoon, in the evening and in the middle of the night.
In the end, the police blocked 21 people from recording their names and entering them into the database.
This includes 17 people, 1 person, 2 people, 1 person, 33 people, 3 people, 40 people and 3 people.
On April 9, 2015, police conducted the last street inspection at the complex, sorting out three men and one woman.
Police obtained a search warrant at 7: 00 on April 16. m.
They took a search warrant to do computer business, arrested two men and one woman, and charged them with drug crimes.
"I think some of us in our community are going to say, 'the police are doing a good job of doing that," Larkin said. '.
Another address is a troubled apartment building located at 48 Weber Street. W. in Kitchener.
On last July, with the support of the police, city bylaw officials cleared the deteriorating building and gave the tenants hours to pack up and leave.
Tenants refer to the building as a disaster and its public areas are littered with evidence of human feces, blood, urine, syringes and other rampant drug use.
City officials cited fire hazards and substandard pipelines.
According to the records, the police visited the building 168 times from 2009 to 2015, preventing 396 people from recording their identity.
During the six months leading up to the closure, the police entered the building 34 times at any time, blocked 48 people and recorded their names.
Ten people were carried many times.
Police conducted their last street check at 48 Weber Street. W.
Six days before the authorities closed the building.
Another prominent address is a troublesome 35-
Apartment building in Erb St 154E. in Waterloo.
In last August, a provincial agency turned off power for five molds
Troubled the unit on the grounds of major electrical problems.
During the period from 2011 to 2015, police visited the building 43 times and stopped 67 people on the street asking them to show their identification.
11 people were driven many times.
Larkin believes that if the police find it more difficult to persuade people to voluntarily provide names under stricter rules, the police may order fewer cards.
If this happens, he expects that the value of the street inspection may become clearer in one way or another.
We sorted out the numbers through the numbersHow. Records analyzed the records of 62,350 persons, and during the period from 2006 to 28,881, the Waterloo district police conducted 10,314 Street inspections at 2015 addresses.
Police intercepted a total of 25,208 different people.
This includes 16,760 stops only once, and 8,448 stops more than once, with an average of five stops each.
The data published to the newspaper included gender, age, race, date, time, and the address of someone blocked by officials.
It does not include the name or home address of the person being blocked.
The police replaced the name with a unique digital identifier, which allowed the newspaper to track the individual over time.
The police provided the match for the 89 people they intercepted.
This includes 67 people only once, and 94 people more than once.
The police do not need to describe the race when completing the Street inspection.
In some cases, the police determine the race based on other records about the person.
Black people account for two of the population of the region, but in the population of all, nine people were stopped, only seven adults were abducted once, and nine people were transported more than once, all eight people were transported.
Who does the police stop every day, ask who, who is the card?
On a typical day, the police intercepted 17 people on the street, asked them to provide identification, and recorded their names without making allegations.
Enter the name and other identification features into the electronic database.
Comb the twisted men and the twisted youth.
On a typical day, 12 men and 4 women will see police cards.
This includes nine people under the age of 30.
Police randomly selected seven persons under the age of 30 and nine persons over the age of 37.
For five people, it was the only time the police warned them.
Because the police had checked them before, a dozen people knew about the exercise.
On a typical day, the police give cards to 12 white people, 2 black people and 1 other visible minority.
There is no record of the two.
Can I refuse to confirm my identity in the street check?
Yes, but in other cases, such as when parking due to traffic violations, you still have to show your identity to the police.
"If people are not arrested, they can leave the police," said Ontario Human Rights Commissioner Renu Mandhane . ".
"In many ways, if people know their rights, the problem may not be a big problem as it is now.
"Jouthit @ therecord.
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