when a car driving itself suddenly needs a person to take over — will the person be ready?when a car driving itself suddenly needs a person to take over — will the person be ready?when a car driving itself suddenly needs a person to take over — will the p

by:Kingcobra     2019-09-13
when a car driving itself suddenly needs a person to take over — will the person be ready?when a car driving itself suddenly needs a person to take over — will the person be ready?when a car driving itself suddenly needs a person to take over — will the p  -  one way car alarm
LOS ANGELES —
A new car that can drive and brake on its own may create a false sense of security for people in the driver's seat --
Even sleep.
One way to keep people alert may be to provide interference that is now illegal.
It was a surprising discovery when researchers put Stanford students in a simulated self
Driving cars to study how they react when their robots
Shaw needs help.
This experiment is one of more and more experiments that evaluate how cars safely return controls to people when they are self-controlling
Driving software and sensors are overwhelmed.
As some models have been able to stay in the driveway or keep a safe distance from other vehicles, automakers are pushing for more automation, carsto-driver hand-
Off is a big problem.
Eliminating distracted driving is a major selling point of the technology.
But in an experiment at Stanford, reading or watching movies helps keep participants awake.
Of the 48 students sitting in the driver's seat, 13 students instructed to watch cars and roads began to nod.
When told to watch the video or read from a tablet, only three people did so.
Alertness is important when students need to grab the steering wheel because a mock car or pedestrian blocks the road.
No consensus on the right carto-driver hand-
Methods: Research from Stanford University suggests that it might be helpful to get people in touch with the media, while some automakers are selling cars that are self-limited
If they find someone stopping paying attention to the road, the driving function slows down the car.
While the research is in progress, it seems that it will take at least five seconds for people to take over-
If not fully checked outSelf-
Google's driving car experts have concluded that getting humans involved will reduce the safety of cars. Google is more active in pursuing the technology than any automaker.
Google's solution is a prototype without the steering wheel and pedals --
Human control will be limited to the go and stop buttons.
At the same time, traditional automakers are gradually adopting the technology.
Cars sold by Mercedes-Benz and Toyota can brake and stay in the driveway.
By adding new features each year, they may produce a real self
Driving in about ten years.
A potential danger of this gradual approach became apparent this fall, when Tesla Motors had to explain that its "self-driving" function did not mean that drivers could stop paying attention.
Several videos posted online show people recording this novelty.
Then, grab the wheel when the car makes amazing moves.
Cadillac CTS will launch the Super Cruise system starting at the end of next year, which will allow half
Automatic road driving.
If the driver's eyes are not on the road and do not respond to repeated urging, the car will slow down.
"We will never sell it as a technology that drivers can view," GM spokesman Dan Flores said . ".
"You can relax and take a look, but you still have to realize that because you know the technology is not foolproof.
"One of the puzzles that automakers have to solve is: how to get owners to trust the technology so they can use it --
But don't trust it so much that they will be deceived by a false sense of security, so the response will be slower when the car needs them.
The researchers published a broad report on themselves in August.
Driving a car funded by the United StatesS.
State Administration of highway traffic safety.
"While this trust is critical to widespread adoption, it is also observed that participants will not
"The activity of driving a vehicle," the author wrote . ". Another wide-
Open question: How to remind the driver of the need to take over the seat.
It seems that the car should attract some attention.
Visual warnings alone may not be enough.
But by combining light with voice commands or body stimuli, such as vibrating seats, people react faster.
Greg Fitch, a research scientist at Virginia Tech's School of Transport, said: "If it's polite, subtle and not annoying, it can be missed by distracted people . ".
Similarly, the way cars interact with people will be a way for automakers to distinguish between products --
Arrogant warnings can upset potential buyers.
Other issues cited by Fitch include "pattern confusion "(
Make sure the car clearly tells people if it drives itself)
And explain clearly to the driver what the car can doand cannot —handle.
Cars with the right sensors have become very good at monitoring the outside world, and the response time is faster than that of humans.
People are better at making decisions when they are uncertain.
A lesson from Stanford's research may be that Masters and machines are better regarded as collaborators.
"There is indeed a relationship between the driver and the car," said David thurkin, who helped run the experiment at Stanford University's design research center. "The relationship is becoming more and more like a companion.
Los Angeles, AP-
A new car that can drive and brake on its own may create a false sense of security for people in the driver's seat --
Even sleep.
One way to keep people alert may be to provide interference that is now illegal.
It was a surprising discovery when researchers put Stanford students in a simulated self
Driving cars to study how they react when their robots
Shaw needs help.
This experiment is one of more and more experiments that evaluate how cars safely return controls to people when they are self-controlling
Driving software and sensors are overwhelmed.
As some models have been able to stay in the driveway or keep a safe distance from other vehicles, automakers are pushing for more automation, carsto-driver hand-
Off is a big problem.
Eliminating distracted driving is a major selling point of the technology.
But in an experiment at Stanford, reading or watching movies helps keep participants awake.
Of the 48 students sitting in the driver's seat, 13 students instructed to watch cars and roads began to nod.
When told to watch the video or read from a tablet, only three people did so.
Alertness is important when students need to grab the steering wheel because a mock car or pedestrian blocks the road.
No consensus on the right carto-driver hand-
Methods: Research from Stanford University suggests that it might be helpful to get people in touch with the media, while some automakers are selling cars that are self-limited
If they find someone stopping paying attention to the road, the driving function slows down the car.
While the research is in progress, it seems that it will take at least five seconds for people to take over-
If not fully checked outSelf-
Google's driving car experts have concluded that getting humans involved will reduce the safety of cars. Google is more active in pursuing the technology than any automaker.
Google's solution is a prototype without the steering wheel and pedals --
Human control will be limited to the go and stop buttons.
At the same time, traditional automakers are gradually adopting the technology.
Cars sold by Mercedes-Benz and Toyota can brake and stay in the driveway.
By adding new features each year, they may produce a real self
Driving in about ten years.
A potential danger of this gradual approach became apparent this fall, when Tesla Motors had to explain that its "self-driving" function did not mean that drivers could stop paying attention.
Several videos posted online show people recording this novelty.
Then, grab the wheel when the car makes amazing moves.
Cadillac CTS will launch the Super Cruise system starting at the end of next year, which will allow half
Automatic road driving.
If the driver's eyes are not on the road and do not respond to repeated urging, the car will slow down.
"We will never sell it as a technology that drivers can view," GM spokesman Dan Flores said . ".
"You can relax and take a look, but you still have to realize that because you know the technology is not foolproof.
"One of the puzzles that automakers have to solve is: how to get owners to trust the technology so they can use it --
But don't trust it so much that they will be deceived by a false sense of security, so the response will be slower when the car needs them.
The researchers published a broad report on themselves in August.
Driving a car funded by the United StatesS.
State Administration of highway traffic safety.
"While this trust is critical to widespread adoption, it is also observed that participants will not
"The activity of driving a vehicle," the author wrote . ". Another wide-
Open question: How to remind the driver of the need to take over the seat.
It seems that the car should attract some attention.
Visual warnings alone may not be enough.
But by combining light with voice commands or body stimuli, such as vibrating seats, people react faster.
Greg Fitch, a research scientist at Virginia Tech's School of Transport, said: "If it's polite, subtle and not annoying, it can be missed by distracted people . ".
Similarly, the way cars interact with people will be a way for automakers to distinguish between products --
Arrogant warnings can upset potential buyers.
Other issues cited by Fitch include "pattern confusion "(
Make sure the car clearly tells people if it drives itself)
And explain clearly to the driver what the car can doand cannot —handle.
Cars with the right sensors have become very good at monitoring the outside world, and the response time is faster than that of humans.
People are better at making decisions when they are uncertain.
A lesson from Stanford's research may be that Masters and machines are better regarded as collaborators.
"There is indeed a relationship between the driver and the car," said David thurkin, who helped run the experiment at Stanford University's design research center. "The relationship is becoming more and more like a companion.
Los Angeles, AP-
A new car that can drive and brake on its own may create a false sense of security for people in the driver's seat --
Even sleep.
One way to keep people alert may be to provide interference that is now illegal.
It was a surprising discovery when researchers put Stanford students in a simulated self
Driving cars to study how they react when their robots
Shaw needs help.
This experiment is one of more and more experiments that evaluate how cars safely return controls to people when they are self-controlling
Driving software and sensors are overwhelmed.
As some models have been able to stay in the driveway or keep a safe distance from other vehicles, automakers are pushing for more automation, carsto-driver hand-
Off is a big problem.
Eliminating distracted driving is a major selling point of the technology.
But in an experiment at Stanford, reading or watching movies helps keep participants awake.
Of the 48 students sitting in the driver's seat, 13 students instructed to watch cars and roads began to nod.
When told to watch the video or read from a tablet, only three people did so.
Alertness is important when students need to grab the steering wheel because a mock car or pedestrian blocks the road.
No consensus on the right carto-driver hand-
Methods: Research from Stanford University suggests that it might be helpful to get people in touch with the media, while some automakers are selling cars that are self-limited
If they find someone stopping paying attention to the road, the driving function slows down the car.
While the research is in progress, it seems that it will take at least five seconds for people to take over-
If not fully checked outSelf-
Google's driving car experts have concluded that getting humans involved will reduce the safety of cars. Google is more active in pursuing the technology than any automaker.
Google's solution is a prototype without the steering wheel and pedals --
Human control will be limited to the go and stop buttons.
At the same time, traditional automakers are gradually adopting the technology.
Cars sold by Mercedes-Benz and Toyota can brake and stay in the driveway.
By adding new features each year, they may produce a real self
Driving in about ten years.
A potential danger of this gradual approach became apparent this fall, when Tesla Motors had to explain that its "self-driving" function did not mean that drivers could stop paying attention.
Several videos posted online show people recording this novelty.
Then, grab the wheel when the car makes amazing moves.
Cadillac CTS will launch the Super Cruise system starting at the end of next year, which will allow half
Automatic road driving.
If the driver's eyes are not on the road and do not respond to repeated urging, the car will slow down.
"We will never sell it as a technology that drivers can view," GM spokesman Dan Flores said . ".
"You can relax and take a look, but you still have to realize that because you know the technology is not foolproof.
"One of the puzzles that automakers have to solve is: how to get owners to trust the technology so they can use it --
But don't trust it so much that they will be deceived by a false sense of security, so the response will be slower when the car needs them.
The researchers published a broad report on themselves in August.
Driving a car funded by the United StatesS.
State Administration of highway traffic safety.
"While this trust is critical to widespread adoption, it is also observed that participants will not
"The activity of driving a vehicle," the author wrote . ". Another wide-
Open question: How to remind the driver of the need to take over the seat.
It seems that the car should attract some attention.
Visual warnings alone may not be enough.
But by combining light with voice commands or body stimuli, such as vibrating seats, people react faster.
Greg Fitch, a research scientist at Virginia Tech's School of Transport, said: "If it's polite, subtle and not annoying, it can be missed by distracted people . ".
Similarly, the way cars interact with people will be a way for automakers to distinguish between products --
Arrogant warnings can upset potential buyers.
Other issues cited by Fitch include "pattern confusion "(
Make sure the car clearly tells people if it drives itself)
And explain clearly to the driver what the car can doand cannot —handle.
Cars with the right sensors have become very good at monitoring the outside world, and the response time is faster than that of humans.
People are better at making decisions when they are uncertain.
A lesson from Stanford's research may be that Masters and machines are better regarded as collaborators.
"There is indeed a relationship between the driver and the car," said David thurkin, who helped run the experiment at Stanford University's design research center. "The relationship is becoming more and more like a companion.
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